Interesting quote from “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars”

Hi – I’m reading “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars” by Mark Batterson and wanted to share this quote with you.

“At the end of the day, success equals stewardship and stewardship equals success. But our view of stewardship is far too parochial. Sure, how we manage our time, talent, and treasure is a huge stewardship issue. But what about being a good steward of our imagination? Or our medial ventral prefrontal cortex (the seat of humor, according to neurologists)? Or how about stewardship of our sex drive and competitive streaks? Stewardship is all-inclusive. We’ve got to be good stewards of every second of time and every ounce of energy. But right at the top of the stewardship list is what I’d call opportunity stewardship. When you cross paths with the lion, are you going to run away like a scaredy-cat or are you going to grab life by the mane? Lion chasers grab life by the mane.”

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Interesting quote from “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars”

Hi – I’m reading “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars” by Mark Batterson and wanted to share this quote with you.

“What sets lion chasers apart isn’t the outcome. It’s the courage to chase God-sized dreams. Lion chasers don’t let their fears or doubts keep them from doing what God has called them to do.”

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Interesting quote from “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars”

Hi – I’m reading “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars” by Mark Batterson and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Is anybody else tired of reactive Christianity that is more known for what it’s against than what it’s for? We’ve become far too defensive. We’ve become far too passive. Lion chasers are proactive. They know that playing it safe is risky. Lion chasers are always on the lookout for God-ordained opportunities. Maybe we’ve measured spiritual maturity the wrong way. Maybe following Christ isn’t supposed to be as safe or as civilized as we’ve been led to believe. Maybe Christ was more dangerous and uncivilized than our Sunday-school flannelgraphs portrayed. Maybe God is raising up a generation of lion chasers.”

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Interesting quote from “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars”

Hi – I’m reading “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day: How to Survive and Thrive When Opportunity Roars” by Mark Batterson and wanted to share this quote with you.

“In his book If Only, 1 Dr. Neal Roese makes a fascinating distinction between two types of regret: regrets of action and regrets of inaction. A regret of action is “wishing you hadn’t done something.” In theological terms, it’s called a sin of commission. A regret of inaction is “wishing you had done something.” In theological terms, it’s a sin of omission. I think the church has fixated on sins of commission for far too long. We have a long list of don’ts. Think of it as holiness by subtraction. We think holiness is the by-product of subtracting something from our lives that shouldn’t be there. And holiness certainly involves subtraction. But I think God is more concerned about sins of omission—those things we could have and should have done. It’s holiness by multiplication. Goodness is not the absence of badness. You can do nothing wrong and still do nothing right. Those who simply run away from sin are half-Christians. Our calling is much higher than simply running away from what’s wrong. We’re called to chase lions.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“If that describes you (if it doesn’t now, it will soon!), I have a four-letter word for you: wait. The word forms an acrostic of four imperatives that you may find helpful. Walk a little slower. When you feel the need to hurry God along or to make something happen to advance God’s agenda for your life, apply the brakes. It’s time to slow your pace, step away from the situation, and devote yourself to a time of solitude and prayer—and perhaps even fasting. Ask some trusted advisers to join you in seeking God’s mind—people who have the love and courage to say things you don’t like to hear. Then resolve not to hurry things along. More often than not, we regret the things we did, not the things we didn’t do. Ask God for increased patience, wisdom, and self-control. No doubt you have already prayed for this, but the very fact that you’re agitated and itching for action says you need to continue asking. Your best decisions occur when your spirit is calm, when confidence in God’s sovereign control has displaced your worry, when you’re tuned in to the gentle prompting of the Holy Spirit. Use prayer as an opportunity to express yourself fully to the Lord. Describe your worry, your fear, your frustration. He already knows everything, of course, but it’s a great relationship builder—not to mention amazingly therapeutic. Imagine the worst-case scenario that might happen if you waited. Instead of running ahead, stop and think ahead: What’s the worst possible outcome if I do nothing? When a situation truly demands action, this question can bring good ideas to the surface. Most often, however, the answer is disappointingly dull. In the case of Abram and Sarai, the worst possible outcome for waiting on pregnancy was more of the status quo. Think of others who will be impacted by your decision. Running ahead of God’s timing always causes collateral damage. You hurt yourself, which is bad enough. You also cause harm to innocent bystanders. In Abram and Sarai’s case, their running ahead changed a young woman’s life forever, and a child was born into a tense, divided household.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Abram left Egypt and traveled north into the Negev, along with his wife and Lot and all that they owned. (Abram was very rich in livestock, silver, and gold.) From the Negev, they continued traveling by stages toward Bethel, and they pitched their tents between Bethel and Ai, where they had camped before. This was the same place where Abram had built the altar, and there he worshiped the LORD again. GENESIS 13: 1-4 In this part of the story, the narrator makes a point of portraying Abram’s return from Egypt as a backtracking. Up from Egypt, through the barren Negev region, and back to Bethel, where Abram had built his last altar. The name Bethel means “house of God.” So Abram came back home, as it were, to the place where he’d last got it right. When he arrived, he worshiped the Lord again. That must have been extremely gratifying. With his return from faithlessness complete, he was ready to begin again.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“4. Every compromise jeopardizes a Sarai. Whenever we revert to our default response, someone gets hurt . . . including those closest to us. Sarai trusted Abram to lead her well and to keep her safe, but his self-serving scheme made her the newest addition to Pharaoh’s harem. As the sun set on that first evening, she must have asked herself, What on earth am I doing in here? How could he have done this to me? Your life consists of relationships arranged in concentric circles. Those living in the closest circles have connected themselves to you, and as a result, they trust you. Your victims might not be aware of the loss you caused them, but they lose nonetheless. There’s no such thing as a victimless sin, including the sins you keep private. You may sin in secret, but you never sin alone. 5. Every Egypt has a Pharaoh. We live among people who do not know our God. They serve the gods of wealth, possessions, power, status, self, and others—there are too many to list. Then they hear someone talking about having a relationship with the one true Creator. Naturally, their curiosity prompts them to observe how this person’s life differs from their own. When they see us blindly blundering through life, making unwise or sinful choices, we bring shame to God rather than glory. Furthermore, we confuse the curious. Nobody respects a phony. No one admires hypocrisy. These principles that Abram learned during his time in Egypt are realistic and relevant for us today. You and I will need them for our own faith journey, especially when a devastating “famine” sweeps unexpectedly into our lives.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Every escape contains a lie. When we do anything we can to avoid facing our crisis of faith, when we seek escape through our old, familiar methods, we tell ourselves a lie: “I can handle this without God.” Our habitual default response—now an unconscious coping strategy—has always worked, so why not again? Why not now? We convince ourselves that with enough ingenuity, guts, and luck, we can survive the famine and dodge much of the pain on our own. Getting to the truth is like peeling an onion, one layer of lies after another, until we discover at our center a person long forgotten. We’ve spent our lives escaping tests rather than walking through them by the power of God. And along the way, we justify, rationalize, excuse, and minimize our misdeeds. Lying has become so easy, we don’t even think of our rationalizations as lies. 3. Every Abram struggles with a weakness. This means you. Everyone, including the good and the godly, carries imperfections and flaws. These weaknesses cause us to make unwise choices as well as sinful, selfish choices. Furthermore, these flaws and their associated coping mechanisms undermine our relationship with God. Our default response competes with faith so that we prefer to trust in ourselves rather than rely upon God to protect us and provide for our needs. More religion isn’t the answer. Don’t tell me how many hours you spend reading the Bible. Don’t tell me how many years you’ve been a church member. Don’t tell me how much theology you know or how many degrees you’ve earned. None of that can protect you from foolish decisions or the lies you tell yourself. We’re all weak, and we need supernatural help. If Abram could fall, soon after building two altars, believe me, you and I can stumble into a moral tumble as well.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“The Lord’s favor on Abram didn’t depend upon the man’s good behavior. Did you notice that God didn’t punish Abram for his failure? In His grace, He blessed Abram despite his lack of trust. Clearly, the Lord’s favor on Abram didn’t depend upon the man’s good behavior. Like a good parent, God allowed the natural consequences of his child’s foolish choices to become a means of instruction. Rather than burying Abram in condemnation and shame, He used this failure as a tool for instruction. At least five principles emerge from this short account of Abram’s wavering faith and default response. 1. Everyone faces famines. Some famines are severe. They knock your feet out from under you and leave you lying flat on your back, with nowhere to look but up. A doctor’s report with the worst possible news. A divorce. The death of a loved one. Unemployment. Bankruptcy. Other famines appear manageable from a human perspective. Either way, these experiences invariably prompt a crisis of faith, challenging you to answer the question, In what do I trust . . . really? Famines, while destructive and fearsome, can provide an opportunity to take your relationship with God deeper. Find a believer you know to be wise, having retained his or her integrity through hardships. Ask this person to share his or her experiences, and then listen carefully. Discover how faith in God’s provision and protection can be strengthened through severe circumstances.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“God doesn’t use difficult circumstances to find out what we’ll do. He doesn’t test us to observe our response of faith. He already knows us better than we know ourselves, and He already knows what the future holds. He uses tests to reveal us to ourselves!”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“God’s Chosen Man We know this man by the name Abraham, but he was born Abram. God changed his name at a critical point in the narrative, but for the first 99 of his 175 years, he answered to Abram. He lived around the end of the Early Bronze Age (circa 2000 BC) in a thriving, bustling, cultured city known as “Ur of the Chaldeans” (Genesis 11: 28). The land of the Chaldeans—also known as Mesopotamia—was located in present-day Iraq, which archaeologists and historians call the cradle of civilization because this is where ancient people first gathered into cities and established societies. “Few periods from ancient history are as well documented by artifacts and inscriptions as is the time of Abraham.”[ 4] Consequently, we know a lot about this man’s culture, religion, beliefs, and everyday life.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Why this particular man? Did Abram turn from the idols of his ancestors and seek God? Did he make himself worthy of divine mercy? Far from it! The Lord chose Abram for reasons known only in heaven. We can say for certain that Abram did nothing to earn or deserve God’s favor. Nevertheless, the Lord appeared to this ignorant, sinful, superstitious idol worshiper and said, “Leave your native country, your relatives, and your father’s family, and go to the land that I will show you. I will make you into a great nation. I will bless you and make you famous, and you will be a blessing to others. I will bless those who bless you and curse those who treat you with contempt. All the families on earth will be blessed through you” (Genesis 12: 1-3). God’s call of Abram began with an imperative—”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“We don’t like waiting, but that’s when God does some of His best work on our souls. When I’m forced to wait on God’s timing, I change. Sometimes I discover that my request was selfish—not part of God’s agenda at all. Other times I find that my level of maturity could not yet bear the blessing God wanted me to enjoy; I had to grow up so I could handle it well. Very often, my circumstances needed to change, or the blessing would have become a burden. As we see Abram’s faith journey unfold, we’ll see why he had to wait so long to receive God’s promised blessings.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Second, the God of the Bible loves you and has been actively involved in your life from the day you were born—and even before.”

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Interesting quote from “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith”

Hi – I’m reading “Abraham: One Nomad’s Amazing Journey of Faith” by Charles R. Swindoll and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Third, God has a plan for you, and this plan includes blessings greater than your ability to imagine.”

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“When it comes to combatting injustice, this has proved to be true: God wants our help. Certainly God can work miracles without us. It’s not that God needs us but that God wants us, and that is pretty spectacular. So next time you ask God to move a mountain, don’t be surprised if God hands you a shovel. This is a divine conspiracy. We get to be a part of the action.”

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“I remember hearing about an old comic strip back in the days of St. Ed’s. Two guys are talking to each other, and one of them says he has a question for God. He wants to ask why God allows all of this poverty and war and suffering to exist in the world. And his friend says, “Well, why don’t you ask?” The fellow shakes his head and says he is scared. When his friend asks why, he mutters, “I’m scared God will ask me the same question.” Over and over, when I ask God why all of these injustices are allowed to exist in the world, I can feel the Spirit whisper to me, “You tell me why we allow this to happen. You are my body, my hands, my feet.””

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“At that moment, we decided to stop complaining about the church we saw, and we set our hearts on becoming the church we dreamed of.”

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“first, the supernatural was hard to recognize. I began to realize that the transcendent comes in many forms. Perhaps the devil is just as likely to wear a three-piece suit as to have horns and a pitchfork. And perhaps the angels look more like the bums in the alley than like feathered white babies. I saw one woman in a crowd as she struggled to get a meal from one of the late-night food vans. When we asked her if the meals were really worth the fight, she said, “Oh yes, but I don’t eat them myself. I get them for another homeless lady, an elderly woman around the corner who can’t fight for a meal.” I saw a street kid get twenty bucks panhandling outside of a store and then immediately run inside to share it with all of his friends. We saw a homeless man lay a pack of cigarettes in the offering plate because it was all he had. I met a blind street musician who was viciously abused by some young guys who would mock her, curse her, and one night even sprayed Lysol in her eyes as a practical joke. As we held her that night, one of us said, “There are a lot of bad folks in the world, aren’t there?” And she said, “Oh, but there are a lot of good ones too. And the bad ones make you, the good ones, seem even sweeter.””

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“There is a movement bubbling up that goes beyond cynicism and celebrates a new way of living, a generation that stops complaining about the church it sees and becomes the church it dreams of. And this little revolution is irresistible. It is a contagious revolution that dances, laughs, and loves.”

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“Today we can hear the whisper where we least expect it: in a baby refugee and in a homeless rabbi, in crack addicts and displaced children, in a groaning creation. In the words that Indian activist and author Arundhati Roy proclaimed at the World Social Forum in Brazil, “Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.” The whisper cries out for God to save the church from us Christians and breathe new life into the aging Body.”

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Interesting quote from “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical”

Hi – I’m reading “The Irresistible Revolution, Updated and Expanded: Living as an Ordinary Radical” by Shane Claiborne and wanted to share this quote with you.

“I thought to myself, Wouldn’t we all go to a church that believes in ordinary fools and ragamuffins and whose gospel is actually good news? I’ve grown to admire the humor of a God who uses foolish things to shame the wisdom of this world, and weaklings to remind the strong that they may not be as mighty as they think they are (1 Cor. 1: 27). And in an era of smart bombs, maybe the world needs more fools. There have always been “fools” in the imperial courts, but it’s an interesting age when folks trust the court jesters more than the court itself.”

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like-minded

Have you ever heard the phrase “If it’s not broke, don’t fix it”?  This refers to the fact that if something is going smoothly leave it alone.  Who or What determines if something isn’t broken.  What is your measuring tool?  The Bible you say!  What part of the bible? Old Testament or New Testament!  Do you only use the part of the bible that supports your belief?  Will you choose Paul over James or James over Paul?

Let’s look at Saul of Tarsus/Paul the Apostle.  One man, two mind sets. Before Damascus and after.  If asked, Saul of Tarsus may have said that he had the mind of Christ, totally unaware that his behavior was far from being Christ like.  All Saul knew was the surrounding from which he was raised.

Where does that leave us?  What’s broken in us that needs fixing?  What will be our measuring tool?  Will we be open to God’s leading?  Will we strive to gain the Mind of Christ before he allows us to see?

In His Name,

Sofia,

Follower of the Way